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In the News

September 2022
In the News

Forum discusses homelessness in Newark and statewide

Since the pandemic began in March 2020, state housing officials have provided motel vouchers to more than 6,000 homeless families at a cost of $25 million.

On Sept. 30, however, that federal pandemic relief money will run out. Delaware’s emergency housing assistance program will revert to pre-pandemic regulations, which provide families with two to three weeks in a motel while they try to find more permanent housing.

“It just brings the reality that we, like many other states, have a housing challenge. Some individuals do not have enough funding, they don’t have enough income, they don’t have that support,” Renee Beaman, director of the Division of State Service Centers, said during a forum on homelessness Sept. 21.

The forum, held at Newark’s city hall, was organized by State Sen. David Sokola and State Rep. Paul Baumbach.

[read the full Newark Post article]

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September 2022
In the News

Delaware Park Casino Donates $7,500 to Boys & Girls Club

Delaware Park Casino & Racing has continued its commitment to the community with a $7,500 donation to Boys & Girls Club of Delaware. Donation boxes are located throughout the casino to collect unused vouchers from guests with the total amount augmented by a cash donation from the casino. Last month, Meals on Wheels Delaware was presented with $10,000 and September’s collections and a donation from Delaware Park will benefit Habitat for Humanity of New Castle County.

“Community outreach is one of our cornerstone values,” said Ron Baumann, President and General Manager of Delaware Park Casino & Racing. “We are committed to monthly fundraising efforts, as well as coordinating opportunities for our Team Members to engage with these vital organizations.”

[read the full Thoroughbred Daily News article]

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September 2022
In the News

People on the Move: Sept. 9

Habitat for Humanity of New Castle County announced the appointment of Jason Patton as vice president of its Board of Directors.  Patton is the new Head of Community and Business Development for the Northeast Division of Chase Bank. He brings with him leadership in the areas of strategic planning, financial health, experience design, and marketing.

Patton’s career at Chase spans over 15 years, and he has held positions as Head of Cross-Line of Business Partnerships and Customer Experience, as well as key roles in Channel Marketing, Product Management, Digital, and Operations Strategy. Prior to his career at Chase, Patton worked at Wells Fargo in Product Development and Experience Design. Patton has an MBA in Global Management from Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business.

[read the full Delaware Business Times article]

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August 2022
In the News

Teamwork is the key at Century 21 Gold Key Realty

Century 21 Gold Key Realty helps their agents work toward their individual career goals with the support of a team atmosphere.

Co-owners and brokers Danielle and Jim Benson founded the business with longtime Realtor friend Ed Adams in 2007 with 15 Realtors, and now the company has grown to over 70 Realtors. The Bensons’ two daughters also work for the company which has its headquarters in Newark and a second office in Dover.

“Flexibility with my schedule and great pay,” “freedom to create my own business” and providing “endless support progressing my professional goals and accomplishments” are a few reasons agents gave in a survey that led to the business winning a Top Workplace award for the eighth straight year.

“We always work together,” said Danielle. “We believe in investing in our agents and their career. We strive to provide best-in-the-business training, technology, resources and support. We treat our agents like family, and we are honored to help each of them create a career they love.”

[read the full article]

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August 2022
In the News

Eight Ways to Reduce Waste

Learn how you can make small changes that are eco-friendly and will have a lasting impact.

As the days start to grow shorter and summer camps draw to a close, it’s time to start thinking back-to-school. Happy parents and sad kids are now getting the school supply lists, digging into the closet to find last year’s backpack and trying to decide just how many new outfits are needed to return to the classroom. Back-to-school can also be a time that generates significant waste. The Nature Conservancy in Pennsylvania & Delaware has released a list of five simple ways you can make the start of the school year more eco-friendly:

1.      Only Buy What You Need 

Before you go shopping, take inventory of what you already have. Consider re-using last year’s backpack and lunch box and see what school supplies you have around your home. Be conservative when you purchase supplies to reduce unnecessary consumption and waste.

2.      Purchase Used or Recycled Materials 

Focus on purchasing items made from recyclable materials such as recycled paper, notebooks and folders. If you are in college and shopping for your textbooks, look to rent or purchase used ones that tend to be cheaper and work just as well as new books. Textbooks are also available to rent online, which would save paper.

3.      Eco-friendly Clothing 

Clothes shopping is an important part of back-to-school shopping and kids grow so fast. Think about what clothes you can buy second-hand which is significantly more affordable and eco-friend. When you buy new clothes, consider buying fewer higher quality pieces that your kids can and avoid “fast fashion”—stylish, but low-quality, clothing that is not made to last and can fall apart easily.

[read the full article] 

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August 2022
In the News

The City of Wilmington Issues Mid-Year Update on its ARPA Neighborhood Plans

Community investment funds are being distributed and affordable housing efforts are underway with the involvement of minority contractors

Wilmington Mayor Mike Purzycki today issued a mid-year update on the City’s neighborhood revitalization plan, which is backed largely with federal funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). The Mayor said progress is underway on the City’s East Side, where the Administration’s citywide neighborhood efforts are initially focused on the area from 4th to 11th streets and Walnut to Church streets. Mayor Purzycki said progress is also being made regarding the Administration’s goal of ensuring that minority contractors, developers, and workers have access to the ARPA-funded projects and jobs being created through the rebuilding of City neighborhoods.

The City today also provided a summary of the ARPA appropriations that have been made thus far to various community-based organizations to further the Administration’s ARPA neighborhood revitalization goals as well as other goals, including community investment and building safer communities by reducing gun violence.

[read full article]

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July 2022
In the News

DNREC, Habitat for Humanity Partner to Create Green Space in New Castle County’s Simonds Gardens Community

On July 5, representatives from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental ControlHabitat for Humanity of New Castle County (HFHNCC), New Castle County and the community of Simonds Gardens gathered to celebrate the completion of a project that transformed a vacant lot into an oasis of green in the city. Highlighting the new rain garden were DNREC Secretary Shawn M. Garvin, HFHNCC CEO Kevin Smith, New Castle County Executive Matt Meyer and Jaywann Saunders of the Simonds Gardens Civic Association.

A week and a half before, on June 25, Habitat hosted a “Rock the Block” event in which volunteers from DNREC and HFH joined community members on the New Castle County-owned 50’x80’ lot to plant a rain garden and install new park benches to invite residents to sit and enjoy the newly-created green space. The project was also supported by a community grant from DNREC and the lot was provided by New Castle County.

“DNREC has a strong commitment to ensuring that all Delawareans, especially those in underserved areas, have equal access to green spaces where residents of all ages can enjoy being outdoors,” said Secretary Garvin. “Rain gardens not only allow the growth of green spaces without the need for watering or regular maintenance, they absorb excess water and can reduce flash flooding, which is especially important in city communities like Simonds Gardens with predominately impervious surfaces.”

[read the full article here]

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June 2022
In the News

Carper, Blunt Rochester Announce $1.5m to Provide Affordable Housing in New Castle County

WILMINGTON, Del. —U.S. Senator Tom Carper and Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester (both D-Del.) today announced a $1.5 million congressionally directed spending award to Habitat for Humanity of New Castle County to help its affordable housing program.

Carper, Blunt Rochester, and Habitat Executive Director Kevin Smith joined together at a Habitat for Humanity construction site in Wilmington to announce the funding, which will be used towards the construction costs associated with 15 homes, to serve about 45 individuals.

“For three decades, Habitat for Humanity of New Castle County has helped to give more than 280 families a safe place to call home. And at a time when too many Delaware families are struggling to find affordable housing, Habitat’s work couldn’t be more important,” said Carper. “I’m proud to announce more than a million dollars in funding today to help build more affordable homes for families in Delaware who need them. My thanks to Senator Coons and Congresswoman Blunt Rochester for joining with me to help secure this funding, and to Kevin Smith with Habitat for his dedicated service to the First State.”

[click below to read the full article]

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June 2022
In the News

Federal officials say efforts in Wilmington are national example of how to address housing shortage

On a day where, nationally, federal officials unveiled an initiative to address the affordable housing shortage, efforts to provide such opportunities in Wilmington were highlighted as an example of what was achievable when all levels of government and community worked together for the greater good.

While U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Regional Administrator Matthew Heckle noted June is a month where homeownership is celebrated, he called June 1st a “national day of action” to answer President Joe Biden’s call to “solve the housing supply deficit that our nation faces, and makes it so difficult for so many families to find, afford and keep a roof over their heads.”

“The problem is pretty simple, really. We haven’t built enough housing over the last several years. For too long, our supply creation has not kept up with the demand,” Heckles said. “By some estimates, I think the one that we trust most, we are down about 1.5 million homes in the country. Here in Delaware, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s report, there are 31 homes available for every 100 of the lowest income renters. There’s a shortage of homes–of affordable homes–in Delaware of 18,000 for the lowest income renters. These are Delawareans who earn $20,000 a year and generally spend over 50% of their income on housing costs. Our answer to that is to increase supply of housing.”

From the front yards of the Habitat For Humanity-built Amara Way II townhomes along Bennett Street in Wilmington–and across from the Amala Way I homes previously completed–HUD Deputy Secretary Adrianne Todman said everywhere she travels across the country, she’s heard from someone who’s had trouble accessing home ownership.

[read more on WDEL]

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